How to Write a Python Try Script?

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To write a Python script that includes a try statement, you can use the following syntax:

try:
    # Code that may raise an exception
    # ...
except ExceptionType:
    # Code to handle the exception
    # ...
else:
    # Code to execute if no exception was raised
    # ...
finally:
    # Code to execute whether or not an exception was raised
    # ...

In this example, the try statement is used to enclose a block of code that may raise an exception. If an exception of the specified ExceptionType is raised, the code inside the corresponding except block will be executed to handle the exception. If no exception is raised, the code inside the else block will be executed. Finally, the code inside the finally block will be executed whether or not an exception was raised.

Here’s an example of a Python script that uses a try statement to handle division by zero:

try:
    numerator = int(input("Enter the numerator: "))
    denominator = int(input("Enter the denominator: "))
    result = numerator / denominator
except ZeroDivisionError:
    print("Error: division by zero")
else:
    print("Result:", result)
finally:
    print("Program complete.")

In this example, the try statement is used to enclose the code that performs division between two numbers. If the user enters a 0 as the denominator, a ZeroDivisionError will be raised, and the code inside the except block will be executed to handle the exception by printing an error message. If no exception is raised, the code inside the else block will be executed to print the result of the division. Finally, the code inside the finally block will be executed to print a message indicating that the program is complete.

Note: It’s important to use try statements sparingly and only for code that may raise an exception. Overuse of try statements can make code harder to read and can mask errors and bugs.

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